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"Possibility and promise greet me each day as I walk out into my garden. My vigor is renewed when I breathe in the earthiness and feel the dirt between my fingers. My garden is a peaceful spot to refresh my soul." Meems






Welcome to my Central Florida Garden Blog where we garden combining Florida natives, Florida-Friendly plants, and tropicals.

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Blue Sage

This is the first winter in three we've gone this long without freeze or frost damage. I know some of my Florida friends took some hard hits in the beginning of the month with temperatures in the twenties.

Again, the canopy of oak trees in my garden protected my shrubs, tropicals, and perennials. I lost some coleus, impatiens, colocasia, and sweet potato vines that were exposed out in the open. No big deal.

This is also the first winter my blue sage (Eranthemum Nervosumor Eranthemum Pulchellum) shrub (above) didn't get knocked back before coming into full bloom with its true-blue clusters of loveliness. It sits on the perimeter of the central pathway and the circle garden in the back yard.
You won't find blue sage in a garden center. Susan from Simply Susan gave me my first cutting. {I've made many additional ones from this shrub since then~~they root easily.} I knew blue sage preferred partial light so I placed it on the edge of the west side of the oak canopy in the back garden. I soft pruned this one back at least 3 times this summer. It made it thicker and bushier than the others I didn't trim. It was an experiment as much as necessity to keep it a proper size for this spot. The latest prune was in September and it still bloomed. You know what that means? I'll be trimming all the others as well this year even though they are more inconspicuously planted among the deeper shade plants.
I made mention of the first Red Admiral to be seen this year on my Hoe and Shovel Facebook page this week (If you haven't visited there yet~~hit the LIKE button to join the conversation). The pretty little thing was happily skipping around from flower cluster to flower cluster.

The large, veined leaves are deeply hued of almost blue-green. In summertime the foliage is all that graces the garden. As autumn nears the end and winter begins this shrub takes on another dimension. Do you see the veined green and white bracts on the ends of the clusters that form prior to the flowers? I just love them. And they will remain even after the flowers fade.

Do you have this Florida old timer in your garden? Happy gardening, Meems

16 comments:

Lona said...

What a beautiful shrub Meems. The blue flowers are so striking on it. I like the variegation's on the new growth by the blooms too. How lovely. I am glad you are able to enjoy the blooms this winter.

Susan said...

Hi Meems...Glad to see your blue sage is blooming. It looks lovely in your January garden.

Janis "Pumpkin" said...

I so not, but am jealous:)

Lisa at Greenbow said...

We have had plenty of freezes but it hasn't been a horrible winter. I am amazed to see your beautiful blue blooms. What a wonderful sight.

Gone Tropical said...

Thank your for featuring this beautiful plant. I will have to look for one now :-)

FlowerLady said...

This is one of my very favorite blues in my gardens. I have a shrub at the back of the property that gets no care from me at all and it is blooming and happy. I need to take cuttings and root them to have all over. I do have them in several spots and just love that true blue. I got this probably 25 years or so ago at a local flea market for $5. Your photos really show the wonderful blues in these blooms.

FlowerLady

daisy said...

What a gorgeous addition to your garden. Enjoy!

Beyond My Garden said...

We, of course, here in WV have had lots of freezes but it is still a very warm winter. We kinda need some colder weather to keep the plants on track.
nellie

Andrea said...

Even just the foliage looks great, but the flowers seem so small and unruly compared to the big size of the plant.

Rohrerbot said...

We have something very closely related here and it does well in Tucson. I'm really happy about the lack of frosty nights here. Last year was too much. This year we need a break and it's nice to watch everything take a breather. Plus I want my Jacaranda to bloom purple this spring:)

ChrisC said...

The cutting I got from you,is also blooming.After the tree went down,it was left in full sun,and then it seemed to really take off.Go figure...I've also been able to root cuttings.Thank you!

Aunt Diane said...

Not only love the blue sage but the heading picture on your blog...displays superb beauty by the Divine :)

Casa Mariposa said...

What a beautiful sage! I don't think it would appreciate our winters, though. The stained glass appearance of the seed heads is beautiful!

NanaK said...

Beautiful photos of this great shrub. I put a picture of it on my blog as well. I think we got cuttings at the same time. I haven't propagated it but sure plan to put some more around the garden. After seeing it bloom this year I'm loving it. Such a great blue color in those bracts.

I'm way behind in gardening and reading gardening blogs so I'm off to catch up on your older posts. Thanks for always providing great info and lots of inspiration!

Corner Gardener Sue said...

What a lovely plant, Meems! It probably doesn't grow in Nebraska. I have pitcher sage that I got from a local plant sale done by our community garden group. I don't think that's available at retail places, either. It has a pretty blue bloom.

Anonymous said...

Several years ago it took me FOREVER to find out the name of this plant. I've had it so long I don't even remember where I got it.

One thing it doesn't like: standing in water. So if you have a spot in your garden that holds water for several days after a storm this plant won't like it.

I've cut off branches of this plant and just stuck them a good way into the ground and they grow.

One of the best things, it adds beautiful color to my garden in the winter, along with my camellias.


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